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THINKING BUSINESS
a blog by Chris Barrow

The Power of Persuasion: How Advocacy Trumps Facts in Marketing and Politics



One of the lessons we are reminded of in this tedious period of Election campaigning is that it is very difficult to change a narrative or belief with facts.


We've had 4 weeks now of televised debates, interviews and broadcasts that have contained nothing more than:


"My facts are better than their facts."


And the reality is that we have already stopped listening to most of the noise.


"We are the X party and our facts are better than the Y and Z party facts."

"We are the Y party and our facts are better than the X and Z party facts."

"We are the Z party and our facts are better than the X and Y party facts."


Yawn.


Imagine now, your dental marketing.


"Here are my facts - and my facts are better than everyone else's facts (or no facts)."


Yawn.


What type of people do you think are interested in your facts?


It's now an old joke - but I'm going to single out teachers and engineers - who want to know as many facts as you do before they make a purchasing decision - but then shop around for the lowest price.


Seth Godin suggests that the people we really want to attract are those who are asking:


"Do people like me visit practices like yours?"


They don't want facts - they want advocacy.


A patient testimonial from "someone like me" is worth more than a thousand facts.


Focus on facts in your marketing and you will attract patients who are looking for a quantitative experience - "how does it work and how much will it cost me?"


Focus on advocacy in your marketing and you will attract patients who are looking for a qualitative experience - price isn't the issue.


  • Google review;

  • Word of Mouth;

  • Selfie;

  • Video testimonial;

  • Case study.


Effective marketing is about advocacy.


Recruit advocates.





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